Feline Desexing

There are already a lot of unwanted kittens out there struggling to find homes.  Desexing your cat will prevent unexpected pregnancies or surprise additions to your animal family. 

For a female cat the procedure is known as a spey.  For a male it is a castration. 

More about cat speys:

What is a cat spey?


A spey (ovariohysterectomy) is the complete removal of the uterus (womb) and both ovaries of a female (queen) cat. This is done under general anaesthetic.




Why spey?


A queen will usually reach sexual maturity between 6 and 8 months of age. At this stage she will start cycling (come into season or on heat) and continue to do so every 2-3 weeks from late winter. When a queen is in season she may call loudly for a male which attracts odorous tom cats from miles around. If mated she will give birth to a litter of 3-5 kittens 9 weeks late. She is capable of producing 2-3 litters per year. The main advantage of speying your cat or kitten is the prevention of unwanted pregnancies. There are a lot of unwanted cats and kittens out there that are already depserately struggling to find homes.




After your cat is speyed:


  • Pregnancy is impossible.
  • She will not attract unwanted attention from tom cats as she will not come into season.
  • She will not suffer from uterine infections (pyometra).
  • She will not wander looking for a mate when in season.




When to spey?


We usually spey kittens between 5-6 months of age. If you have any questions regarding the age of your cat and when is the best time to spey, give us a call.





More about cat castration:

What is a cat castration?


Castration is the complete removal of both of a male (tom) cat's testicles. This is done under general anaesthetic via two small incision in the scrotum.




Why castrate?


  • When a male cat reaches sexual maturity at 6-8 months he may start to wander, potentially upsetting the neighbours, bullying their cats, and putting himself at risk of being hit by a vehicle.
  • Entire (uncastrated) tom cats get into more fights which can result in injuries such as bites, scratches, eye damage, and abscesses. Cats that fight are also at a far greater risk of catching feline AIDS (FIV).
  • An uncastrated cat will usually mark (urine spray) their own homes as well as their neighbours', resulting in a very unpleasant smell that is hard to eradicate.
    • A small percentage of castrated cats will continue to have some urine marking bahaviour, but the urine itself will be much less offensive smelling.
  • Castration may stop competition for females and territorial behaviour, however it will not stop a tom cat's natural instincts to hunt or defend himself.
  • The main advantage of castrating your cat or kitten is the prevention of unwanted pregnancies.
    • There are a lot of unwanted cats and kittens out there that are already desperately struggling to find homes.




When to castrate?


We usually castrate kittens between 5-6 months of age. If you have any questions regarding the age of your cat and when is the best time to castrate, give us a call.