Cat Vaccinations

The standard cat vaccination protects against feline enteritis and the two main causes of snuffles: calicivirus and rhinoenteritis.

Vaccination is recommended in order to keep your cat healthy and disease-free.  Vaccination is required in order to check your cat into a cattery or pet boarding facility.

How does it work?

 

When your cat or kitten is vaccinated for the first time, an initial course of two injections 3-4 weeks apart is needed. Typically the first injection is given at 8 or 9 weeks of age, and the second at 12 weeks of age.  The kitten needs to be 12 weeks or older at the time of the second injection.

The age at which the initial course is given can very depending on the age of the kitten when he or she joins your family. 

A previously unvaccinated adult cat beginning a vaccination course for the first time will also require two injections 3-4 weeks apart.

Yearly vaccinations

To maintain immunity we advise that your cat receive a vaccination booster one year (12 months) after the initial course of vaccinations.  After this your cat may be vaccinated every second year, though there are some instances where you cat may continue to receive a vaccination every year.  Some boarding kennels or catteries require that vaccinations be done every year - it is worthwhile checking this out with your regular kennel or cattery. 

If the time between annual or biennial boosters exceeds 3 years, the initial vaccination course will need to be started from scratch - so it is important yo keep vaccinations up to date!

The standard cat vaccination provides protection against:

Feline Enteritis


Feline Enteritis is also known as Feline Panleucopaenia or “cat flu” and is a highly infectious disease caused by the Feline panleucopaenia virus (FPV). FPV is highly fatal to kittens. Symptoms include: - Fever - Vomiting - Bloody diarrhoea - Severe dehydration - Lethargy - Loss of appetite




Feline Calicivirus


One of the two main causes of snuffles is feline calicivirus (FCV). Around 90% of snuffles cases are caused by either feline calicivirus or rhinotracheitis. FCV can cause fever and lameness and is particularly serious in young kittens. Most cats infected with FCV will become carriers for the virus - meaning they will continue to spread the infection among the cat population. Symptoms include: - Fever - Conjunctivitis - Sneezing - Nasal Discharge - Mouth Ulcers - Loss of appetite - Depression




Feline Rhinotracheitis


One of the two main causes of snuffles is feline rhinotracheitis or herpesvirus (FHV). Around 90% of snuffles cases are caused by either feline calicivirus or rhinotracheitis/herpesvirus. FHV is extremely contagious and is particularly serious in young kittens. Most cats infected with FHV will become carriers for the virus - meaning they will be prone to sudden flare ups for the rest of their lives. Symptoms include: - Fever - Conjunctivitis - Sneezing - Nasal Discharge - Mouth Ulcers - Loss of appetite - Depression





Feline AIDS

 

Cats can also be vaccinated against Feline AIDS.  This is not includes in the standard cat vaccine and requires a separate course of vaccines.  This can be given at the same time as the standard cat vaccine.  Feel free to contact us (or your own local veterinarian) to discuss the Feline AIDS vaccine. 

More about Feline AIDS...


Feline AIDS is caused by the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and it is reported that up to 29% of cats in New Zealand may test positive to the disease. Cats infected with FIV may eventually develop feline AIDS, though it may take a long time to produce any ill effects. An FIV-infected cat may remain in perfectly good health for up to 10 years after becoming infected so, when a healthy cat of any age is diagnosed as being FIV-infected, this is not usually a 'death sentence' or a reason for euthanasia. Cats usually contract FIV as a consequence of being bitten by another cat that is already infected. The virus is shed in high levels through saliva. FIV infection is much more common in outdoor cats with a tendency to fight. The spread of FIV via water bowls or grooming is not common. Vaccination is the best way to prevent the disease in at-risk cats. There is no treatment or cure for a cat infected with FIV.